Lisp代写|ECS 140A – Programming Languages Project 3: Lisp

本次代写是一个编程语言Lisp相关的Project

Getting Started

There are three major methods of installing Common Lisp:

1. Using Portacle https://portacle.github.io

Portacle is a complete IDE for Common Lisp. It has a similar interface as Emacs. It has a REPL
environment in so that you may test your code piecewise more easily.

(Note: For some reason, I couldn’t install it on MacOS 11. It worked on older versions of MacOS.
I’m not sure about MacOS 12.)

2. Using terminal:

To install: enter brew install clisp in the command line.

To execute a file (extension is .lisp): enter clisp filename in the command line.

This is the easiest way to install and run, but it doesn’t have REPL.

3. Using Emacs and SLIME

To install: https://lisp-lang.org/learn/getting-started/

This interface is not very easy to work unless you are familiar with Emacs.

There are two (unrelated) parts of the project.

Part 1: Fibonacci Sequence

The Fibonacci sequence is defined as follows:

F0 = 0, F1 = 1, Fn = Fn−1 + Fn−2

The sequence is

0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, …

In this part, you will write three functions related to the Fibonacci sequence. All three functions are
written in the file fibonacci.lisp.

1. nth-fib

Write a function called nth-fib that given a number n, returns the nth number in the Fibonacci
sequence. Example: (nth-fib 9) should return the integer 34.

2. fib

Write a function called fib that given a number n, returns the frist n numbers in the Fibonacci
sequence. Example: (fib 9) should return the list (0 1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21).
Hint: You may define a helper function with extra parameters to store the previous two numbers
and the current result list you have computed so far.

3. fib-lt

Write a function called fib-lt that given a number n, returns all the numbers in the Fibonacci
sequence that are less than n.
Example: (fib-lt 100) should return the list (0 1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34 55 89).
Note: You do not need to worry about integer flow.

Part 2: Pattern Matching Program

We say an assertion is a list of strings such as (apple banana) (note: no quotations). A pattern is a list of
atoms that may contain the special symbols ! and *.

• The special symbol ! means matching zero or more atoms.
Example: The pattern (apple ! blueberry) and the assertion (apple banana orange blueberry) match.

• The special symbol * means matching zero or more characters inside an atom.
Example: The pattern (apple bl*rry) and the assertion (apple blueberry) match.

Note: An assertion cannot contain the special symbols ! and *. You may assume patterns and asser
tions do not contain numbers as atoms. For example, (apple 2 banana) is not allowed but
(apple2 banana) is.

Write a function called match in the match.lisp file. Given a pattern and an assertion, the function
returns true (t in Lisp) when they match and returns false (nil in Lisp) otherwise.

Examples:

1. (match ’(color apple red) ’(color apple red))
) t
2. (match ’(color apple red) ’(color apple green))
) nil
3. (match ’(! table !) ’(this table supports a block))
) t
4. (match ’(this table !) ’(this table supports a block))
) t
5. (match ’(! brown) ’(green red brown yellow))
) nil
6. (match ’(! brown) ’(green red brown brown))
) t
7. (match ’(red green ! blue) ’(red green blue))
) t
8. (match ’(red gr*n blue) ’(red green blue))
) t


程序代写代做C/C++/JAVA/安卓/PYTHON/留学生/PHP/APP开发/MATLAB


本网站支持淘宝 支付宝 微信支付  paypal等等交易。如果不放心可以用淘宝交易!

E-mail: itcsdx@outlook.com  微信:itcsdx


如果您使用手机请先保存二维码,微信识别。如果用电脑,直接掏出手机果断扫描。

blank

发表评论